Preventative Care

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Immunizations

Vaccines are one of the safest and best methods of prevention. Immunizations can be administered to patients with minor illnesses, such as an ear infection or runny nose. Patients experiencing moderate to severe sickness should not receive some vaccinations, and those with other health conditions should not be given specific vaccines or receive them at a later date.

Visit the CDC Immunization Schedule to view and print a schedule of vaccinations.  These schedules list the age or range of ages when each vaccine, or series of vaccines, is recommended.

Visit the CDC Vaccine Information Page to receive a vaccine information statement (VIS).  Here you can get information about any vaccine.

Vaccines aren't just for kids!  Store your adult immunization record in ImmTrac, the Texas immunization registry.  It's free, secure and confidential.  Visit ImmTrac.com for the form and instructions on how to do this.

INFLUENZA

The first and most important step in preventing flu is to get a flu vaccination each year. The CDC also recommends everyday preventive actions (like staying away from people who are sick, covering coughs and sneezes and frequent handwashing) to help slow the spread of germs that cause respiratory (nose, throat, and lungs) illnesses, like flu.

Anyone can get the flu (even healthy people), and serious problems related to the flu can happen at any age, but some people are at higher risk of developing serious flu-related complications if they get sick. This includes people 65 years and older, people of any age with certain chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease), pregnant women, and young children.

Physical Exams

We recommend that adults have a physical exam each year to screen for diseases, determine the risks of possible future medical problems, update vaccinations and promote a healthy lifestyle. The majority of patients only seek medical attention if he/she is ill. Maintaining a relationship with your doctor, even when you are well, will allow us to recognize potential problems early and treat them before they become more serious. During this exam, your physician will discuss your family history and medical history, as well as thoroughly examine the following for any abnormal signs/symptoms that may indicate an impending medical issue:

  • Skin
  • Entire head
  • Eyes
  • Ears
  • Nose and sinuses
  • Mouth and pharynx
  • Neck
  • Back
  • Breast and armpits
  • Heart
  • Lungs
  • Abdomen
  • Rectum and anus
  • Reproductive Organs
  • Legs
  • Blood vessels
  • Spine

Sports Physicals

A sports physical will determine if your child is physically fit enough to perform certain activities. Many sport organizations and schools require a physical exam prior to your child's participation in a sport. We will review individual and family health history and check the following:

  • Check blood pressure, pulse reading
  • Record weight and height
  • Check lungs, heart, abdomen, ears, nose and throat
  • Evaluate posture, joints, reflexes, strength and flexibility
  • Check vision

Cancer Screening

Early detection is the key to surviving cancer, no matter what kind of cancer it may be. During your annual physical exam, your physician will screen for all types of cancer, including breast, ovarian, testicular, prostate, colon and skin cancer, just to name a few. Many factors determine when a patient should start having a cancer screening, such as age, gender, medical history and family history. Consult your physician about when you should start receiving annual cancer screenings. It is also just as important to perform self-exams to screen for cancer of the breasts, testes and skin.

Screening for blood in stool.....If you are given an envelope for stool collection and have any questions, please watch this video.  It will show step by step how to collect the stool sample.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSfd3mHayOA&feature=em-share_video_user&noredirect=1